Teaching Remotely on You Tube

my new classroom: a desk, a laptop and a blue background to hide my messy room

Welcome to teaching in 2020.

The photo above is my new classroom, which is a corner of my bedroom, where I spent 6 hours a day, 5 days a week. In this little corner, I sat at my desk and created lessons for my students to do on their own or I talked to them individually via Zoom. Because I work with severely disabled students, I needed to spend a lot of time remotely training their caregivers too. Some of the caregivers are parents who were suddenly providing around the clock care to their medically fragile children during a pandemic while trying to work remotely. Many of the parents had other children who needed their help with school work.

Welcome to parenting in 2020.

Making Videos for Parents

I began recording videos for parents and caregivers that explained how to educate a student who is visually impaired. It is the same information the aids and teachers get from me at school, but I needed to make it even more succinct for families. The aids at school get direct training over several months, but parents needed that training immediately. Some things they needed to know were:

  • How do you present materials so the student can actually see what you’re showing them?
  • How do you explain what is causing a particular sound when the student can’t see what it is?
  • How do you talk about what is happening in a picture or video that makes sense to a student who can’t see the details of the image?
  • What is Orientation and Mobility? How do you practice it at home?
  • How do you work on a student’s IEP goal at home?

First, I tried to think of what would have the most immediate impact on a parent’s ability to teach their child. My first video was about using descriptive language and how parents could talk about riding a bus while keeping in mind what the student is experiencing (sounds, texture, movement…). But then I realized no one was going to be taking a bus to school any time soon, so my next video lesson was about using descriptive language while cooking a meal. That one seemed to work, so I tried modeling the rest of my videos with home based learning as the focus.

I also tried to think of how to explain general concepts about vision impairment (glare, fixation, lighting, tracking, scanning… etc). Many of my students have Cortical Visual Impairment, so I’m currently working on videos to explain what that is and how to work with a student who appears to see but isn’t understanding what they are seeing.

My You Tube Channel

I shared a few videos with some friends who also have kids with disabilities but don’t attend my school. Those families have asked for more. So now I have a You Tube Channel. You Tube helped me figure out how to access Google Classroom and create content and use Drop Box and Zoom and Padlet and Flip Grid, which are all the platforms I’ve used to make teaching easier for me and easier for families. I hope that my videos will also be helpful.

What will teaching be like in the Fall?

My school is currently on summer break. Schools across my State are making plans to reopen in the Fall. Will it be home based learning again, or will students return to their classroom? Will it be a blend, with some students on campus and others at home? My students are medically fragile so many will choose to stay home, but some may want to see their friends and teachers again. Can we keep them safe? How? And how will teachers stay safe when schools reopen?

I can’t fix education during a pandemic, but if my videos can help a few parents figure out how to support their visually impaired children while they shelter-in-place, then I’ve done part of my job as a teacher. Now, does anyone know how to integrate a Vision Goal into doing the dishes?

When you’re teaching at a medical conference, listen to your audience!

After the UMDF conference last year, I thought about all the people I saw with a vision impairment. How could I help? I submitted a proposal for a workshop addressing the needs of people coping with vision loss and their loved ones. UMDF liked the idea and put me in touch with the head of the L.H.O.N. group.

L.H.O.N, which stands for Leibers Hereditary Optic Neuropathy, is a vision impairment caused by mitochondrial disease. Even though I’m an Orientation and Mobility Specialist with a Master’s Degree in Vision Impairments, I had never heard of this disorder (more about L.H.O.N. in a later post). Maria (Girl Gone Blind) and I talked on the phone and she helped me develop my presentation. I would give the talk twice, once for those affected by L.H.O.N, and again in the general assembly for anyone dealing with other forms of vision loss. I put together a Power Point presentation, wrote my bio, packed my suitcase, and flew to Washington DC (Alexandria, VA to be exact. Just across the Potomac river).

People asked me if I was nervous. Funny thing, I wasn’t. The idea of talking to a room full of interested strangers didn’t worry me at all. I have information, I love to teach, they want to learn… perfect. However, as I stepped in front of a crowd of people with a vision impairment and their loved ones, I suddenly felt afraid. What did I have to offer these experts? They were living with vision loss while I’m just a teacher who can show them how to travel with a white cane.

That’s how I began. I focused my talk on communication between the person with vision loss and their family and friends. The only way to be an effective partner is through respect and communication. I did an abbreviated demonstration of Human Guide technique and moved on to how to support a person with vision loss in crowded and unfamiliar areas. Basically, “don’t ditch your loved one at a party.” After my talk I heard mixed reviews. Some people gave me a big thumbs up and said it was “great.” Others felt I didn’t present anything new and was “preaching to the choir.” I realized that mostly the people who thought it was great were people without vision loss. The people with vision loss were mostly bored. Oh well… like I said, they’re the expert.

The next day I gave my talk to the general assembly. However, as I began talking about supporting your loved one with vision loss, a woman raised her hand and asked, “Is this just about blind people?” I was afraid that would happen. The conference program left out vision loss in the description. Standing in a room filled with people looking for information about wheelchairs, walkers, and coping with changing mobility, I realized I had no idea what to say. So I took a deep breath, threw my notes aside, and started talking about my own experience working with my daughter and her changing needs. I also talked about working with older adults and how they struggled as their needs increased. Thankfully my audience started talking and sharing stories. I stepped back and facilitated the conversation. Dropping my teacher role, I became the advocate, a role I’ve played for 20 years. Once again, I was not the expert in the room; the people sharing their stories about declining mobility and strength were the experts. My talk went in a completely unexpected and unplanned direction and I loved it!

It’s funny that I was more nervous with my planned talk in front of an audience of mostly visually impaired people than I was winging it without notes. All those years I spent doing improv paid off. I used my theater background, advocacy and mediation training, and what I’ve learned being the parent of a child with a disability, and just followed my gut. But if the people in the room hadn’t starting talking, I would have been screwed. Once again, thank you experts!

I hope to give more talks in the future. I love teaching and interacting with people. My next topic will be on advocacy and independence. Need a speaker?

My next blog post will be about the day I spent lobbying for health care on Capitol Hill. This just happened to be the week the vote on repealing The Affordable Care Act was being debated by the GOP.  Interesting adventure.